Why follow Jesus?

Our discussion on Tuesday night led to an excellent question by Frank. I’m not good at capturing a verbatim of a conversation, but the gist went something like this: If the kingdom of God is the goal of the Christian life and heaven is not, if we no longer have the carrot of heaven and the stick of hell to motivate us, why would anyone choose to work for the kingdom of God? What is the motivation? Why follow Jesus if there is no tangible reward?

(Frank, I hope that this summary is fair to the essence of what you were asking.)

The traditional form of Christianity has obviously been organized around eternal reward and eternal punishment. As we discussed, if eternal punishment is off the table (per Ron Bell), and if a loving God brings everyone to heaven—even non-Christians (universal salvation)—and if we don’t have to do anything or believe anything to qualify, why should our lives be moral? Why should we care about social justice? Why should we do anything about poverty and ecological destruction? Why not just live for ourselves?

We talked a bit about the intangible rewards of working to bring about the kingdom of God. For instance, it was mentioned that in building a Habitat house for someone in need of decent affordable housing, there is a sense of satisfaction from knowing you have helped someone experience a better life. I guess what we are dealing with here is altruism—a selfless concern for the welfare of others. It is the opposite of selfishness. But why not be selfish, if we get to heaven regardless? Many non-Christians are altruistic. What motivates them?

For me the motivation is Jesus. It is found in taking Jesus seriously. It is seeing Jesus not as an instrument whose death and resurrection gets me entry into heaven, but rather as a model of the godly life. Jesus is a model of what it means to be fully human, and I want to be as fully human as I can be.

Frank’s question was excellent and I need to do much more thinking about how to better answer it, because it is essential to progressive Christianity. I’m wondering how others in the group would respond.

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3 thoughts on “Why follow Jesus?

  1. Pingback: Carrots And Sticks « Learning From Others, Seeking The Way

  2. Those are basically my thoughts as well. If God is like Jesus and therefore Jesus is a model of what God is like then it stand to reason that we should follow Jesus and his Way so that we also will be “like God” as much as we possibly can be. Jesus showed his followers how to live, he commanded them (us) to love one another and to be servants to each other. He cared about the poor and those who were in need in any way and if we are his followers then that is what we are to do as well. Therefore, we are to take care of each other and to build the Kingdom of God in this way. This is the essence of being a follower of Jesus which in turn is being as much like God as a human being could be. That is the meaning (IMO) of being a Christian and that is why I hope for an eternity with God.

  3. I really like this question and I’m sorry I missed the original discussion. When I became a spiritual director many years ago, I was asked to come up with another name for Jesus. I identified him as my “yes” man–someone I said “yes” to when I really wanted to say “no.” Jesus is a role model for me, someone who didn’t take the easy, conventional approach to how he made decisions, loved others, and carried out his actions/behaviors. In trying to be fully human, I know that I need to be in prayer with this “yes” man so I can lay down anything that separates me from being the best I can be. Eternal life is now, this daily struggle, and it contains it’s own rewards and punishments.

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